People

Contact Info
Stephen C. Lougheed
Professor, Department of Biology and School of Environmental Studies
Director, Queen's University Biological Station and Elbow Lake Environmental Education Centre
Department of Biology, Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
Telephone: 613-533-6128
FAX: 613-533-6617
email: steve.lougheed@queensu.ca

Present

Postdoctoral Fellows

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  • Amy Chabot Project: Conservation genomics of loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus). African Lion Safari and Queen’s University.
  • BIO: Amy completed her M.Sc. at McGill University. After a decade working as a biological consultant and for various non-profit organizations including Bird Studies Canada and the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests she returned to academia. She completed her PhD, which investigated the impact of migration on gene flow in a North American grassland bird, in Dr. Lougheed’s lab at Queen’s in 2011. She has returned as a post-doctoral fellow working with Queen’s and African Lion Safari to develop genomics tools to assist in conservation.
  • email: amy.chabot@queensu.ca

 

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  • Rute Clemente-Carvalho Project: Genomics of fish and bears.
  • BIO: Rute completed her MSc at the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil (MZUSP) and PhD at Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil (UNICAMP). Her research interests centre on population genetics and systematics, and in particular on patterns of morphological differentiation and molecular divergence among populations across their geographic ranges. She spent one year (2010-2011 )in Lougheed’s lab as postdoc examining the phytogeography of Argentine toads Melaphryniscus rubriventris. She has returned to our lab to oversee some exciting Arctic fisheries and polar bear genomics projects.
  • email: rute_beatriz@hotmail.com

 

Graduate Students

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  • Danielle Beaulne (M.Sc. started 2015) Provisional thesis title: TBA Co-supervised with Georgia Fotopoulos (Geology).
  • BIO: Danielle completed her B.Sc. at Queen’s University in the Department of Geological Engineering. Throughout her undergrad, Danielle continued to pursue her interest in biology by taking courses in the department. With the intent of linking her passions, she is now pursuing an M.Sc. under the co-supervision of professors in both the Biology and Geology Departments. Whether it’s looking at rocks, or climbing them indoors, Danielle pursues her interests inside and outside of the lab.

  • email: danielle.beaulne@queensu.ca
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  • Nick Cairns (Ph.D. started 2013) Working thesis title: Genomic insights into speciation in spring peepers.
  • BIO: Nick did his B.Sc. at Brandon University including an undergraduate thesis investigating small snake ecology with Dr. Pamela Rutherford, he completed his M.Sc. on freshwater turtle bycatch and mitigation with Dr. Gabriel Blouin-Demers (University of Ottawa) and Dr. Steven Cooke (Carleton University). His current project is focuses on using genomic tools to look for the signature of reproductive isolation between lineages of the spring peeper (Pseudacris crucifer). Nick’s academic interests reflect his personal ones, he enjoys observing flora and fauna with a particular interest in arid-land natural history.
  • email: 13nc5@queensu.ca
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  • Amanda Cicchino (M.Sc. started 2015) Provisional thesis title: Sexual selection and gene flow: Pseudacris crucifer interactions in secondary contact.
  • BIO: Amanda received her B.Sc. at Queen’s University, completing an Honour’s thesis with Steve on the call evolution of the Spring Peeper. Her interests in evolutionary biology and animal mating systems were strengthened throughout her thesis, leading her to pursue an M.Sc. further investigating the Spring Peeper complex. When she’s not knee-deep in a marsh recording frogs, Amanda enjoys playing Ultimate Frisbee, beating lab-mate Becky at squash, and attending the occasional gala.
  • email: 0asc3@queensu.ca
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  • Wenxi Feng (M.Sc. started 2014; switch to PhD 2016) Provision thesis title: eDNA approaches to quantifying species distributions.
  • BIO: Wenxi Feng finished his undergraduate degree at Fudan University, Shanghai, China. He met Steve through his Canada-China field course (taught with colleague Yuxiang Wang) in 2012 and decided to come to Queen’s for graduate work. His current research involves using environmental DNA (eDNA) to map turtle species distributions in Eastern Ontario and developing eDNA based fish community survey protocols for Eastern China freshwater lakes.
  • email: 14wwf@queensu.ca
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  • Megan Hazell (Ph.D. started 2015) Provision thesis title: Spatial genomics and conservation of temperate snakes.
  • BIO:
  • email: to come
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  • Leslie Holmes (Ph.D. started 2012) Provisional thesis title: Evolution of the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculates, in response to stress in the face of predation and competition. Co-supervised with Bill Nelson.
  • BIO: Leslie received her bachelor of forensic science degree from the University of Windsor in 2008. Early in her undergrad degree, she began working in a forensic entomology lab as a work study student. Helping graduate students at the time with their theses, she became enamoured with the study of insects and their application in forensics. She completed her Master’s degree under the supervision of Dr. VanLaerhoven at Windsor working on the life-history of the black soldier fly to see how we might maintain soldier fly-based waste management facilities year-round in southern Ontario. During her MSc. she was afforded the opportunity to spend a year in Texas working under the mentorship of Dr. Tomberlin at Texas A&M University. She moved to Queen’s University to undertake a PhD with Drs. Bill Nelson & Steve Lougheed using cowpea weevils in the lab to address issues in evolutionary ecology related to competition & predation.
  • email: 12lh22@queensu.ca
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  • Michael Patrikeev (Ph.D. started 2012) Provisional thesis title: Diversification of anurans in the Atlantic Coastal Forests of Brazil.
  • BIO: Michael received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the University of St. Petersburg, Russia where he studied nesting biology of birds of prey. After graduation he did research on birds in Russia and Azerbaijan, and since 1992 has lived in Canada. He has worked for the Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and  is currently an ecosystem scientist with Parks Canada. His main interests are Neotropical birds and amphibians, but he is also interested in other vertebrates, both terrestrial and marine, and conservation biology in general.
  • email: mpatrikeev@hotmail.com
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  • Megan Snetsinger (M.Sc. started 2014) Provision thesis title: Landscape genetics of the Butler’s gartersnake.
  • BIO: Megan got her B.Sc. in Biology and Mathematics at Queen’s University, which culminated with an honours thesis on Daphnia predator response in Dr. Shelley Arnott’s lab. For her graduate work she changed directions, looking at spatial ecology through the lens of genetics. Since joining the Lougheed Lab, Megan has spent her time catching snakes in the field and processing thousands of tiny tubes in the lab. Outside of the academic scene, Megan’s personal pursuits include swing dancing, knitting, and geocaching.
  • email: 8ms65@queensu.ca
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  • Becky Taylor (Ph.D started 2013) Provision thesis title: Parallel divergence by allochrony in the band-rumped storm-petrel species complex (Hydrobates spp.). Co-supervised with Vicki Friesen.
  • BIO: Becky completed her undergrad degree at the University of Bristol, UK, including a thesis on the behaviour of red foxes at the boundary of their home range. She then worked as a researcher for a conservation organisation for 2 years, before undertaking her M.Sc. at the University of Exeter, UK. For her Masters she investigated Wolbachia prevalence, phylogenetics and horizontal transfer in wild British moth species. Her continued interest in phylogenetics and conservation  prompted her to move to Queen’s to undertake genomics research on allochronic speciation in a cryptic species complex of seabird, the band-rumped storm-petrel. Outside of her academic studies, Becky enjoys travelling, football (soccer), and beating her lab mate Amanda at squash.
  • email: 13rst@queensu.ca

Research Associates

Undergraduate Thesis Students

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  • Ying Chen
  • B.Sc. Honours candidate. 2016-17. Provisional thesis title: Biotic & abiotic predictors of frog breeding phenology and habitat occupancy.
  • email:
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  • Emily Drinkwater
  • B.Sc. Honours candidate. 2016-17. Provisional thesis title: Niche modelling & predictors of habitat occupancy for loggerhead shrikes.
  • email:
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  • Peiwen Li
  • B.Sc. Honours candidate. 2016-17. Provisional thesis title: Stock genomics of arctic char in the Lower Northwest Passage.
  • email:
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  • Louisa Kennett
  • B.Sc. Honours candidate. 2016-17. Provisional thesis title: Phylogeography of the mink frog and its co-distributed congeners. Comparing genealogical patterns of primary vs. secondary post-glacial colonizers.
  • email:

Past

Postdoctoral Fellows

Graduate Students

Undergraduate Thesis Students

Past Visiting Scientists

Work Study Students & Lab Volunteers

International Internship Students

Research Associates

(from St. Lawrence College)